Yorkshire Regiment War Graves
Yorkshire Regiment War Graves, -
Mirfield (St. Mary's) Churchyard, - West Yorkshire
Yorkshire Regiment War Graves

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Mirfield (St. Mary's) Churchyard contains 34 Commonwealth War Graves from the both World Wars, including 20 from the First World War. Amongst the graves are two for soldiers who served with the Yorkshire Regiment.

We are extremely grateful to Richard Roberts (<richard.nsw@googlemail.com>) for the photographs of the headstones, and also of the church and churchyard. Richard has also provided some notes as to the history of the church.

Private Fred Booth. 235291.
  Private Reginald M Booth. 47959.
Depot the Yorkshire Regiment. Adopted son of Charles Henry & Annie Booth of Mirfield. Died at home 5 December 1918. Aged 20.

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(Another soldier with the surname "Booth" from Mirfield is commemorated on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. Private Fred Booth, son of John Thomas and Annie Booth, of Lee Green, Mirfield, Yorks. Killed 3 August 1917. Aged 19.)

Private Charles Henry Hollingworth, 41763.
  Private Charles Henry Hollingworth, 41763.
6th Battalion the Yorkshire Regiment, formerly 185012 R F A. Died at home 30 October 1917.
Enlisted Pontefract, Resided Ravensthorpe.

For a larger sized image which opens in a new window, select the small image on the left.

Private Booth's grave in Mirfield (St. Mary) Churchyard Private Booth's grave in Mirfield (St. Mary) Churchyard
Photo : Richard Roberts (<richard.nsw@googlemail.com>)

Private Hollingworth's grave in Mirfield (St. Mary) Churchyard Private Hollingworth's grave in Mirfield (St. Mary) Churchyard
Photo : Richard Roberts (<richard.nsw@googlemail.com>)

St. Mary's Church, MirfieldSt. Mary's Church, Mirfield
Photo : Richard Roberts (<richard.nsw@googlemail.com>)

St. Mary's Church, MirfieldSt. Mary's Church, Mirfield
Photo : Richard Roberts (<richard.nsw@googlemail.com>)

The following notes on the history of St. Mary's Church are provided by Richard Roberts (<richard.nsw@googlemail.com>) ;-

Following the Norman Conquest a motte and bailey was constructed at Mirfield using a mound and moat already in existence from earlier fortifications. A 13th century chapel was built on ground that was originally within the bailey of Mirfield Castle and this was rebuilt in 1826. The Bronte sisters worshipped there. The present church designed by Sir Gilbert Scott was built in 1871 to replace the old church which was demolished along with the adjacent Castle Hall. The tower of the original chapel was preserved and left standing beside the present church. The motte of the castle is still to be seen behind the church but is very overgrown as is the surrounding churchyard. Fortunately, the CWGC maintains access to the war graves.

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