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Dennis Wilson, <goldwolf82@hotmail.com> has kindly provided a photograph of the Memorial Scroll, Memorial Plaque, and World War 1 campaign medals for his uncle, John Wilson of the 2nd Battalion the Yorkshire Regiment. These items are mounted in a frame, together with a photo of John Wilson, and are in the possession of the Wilson family. As this forms a unique family memorial, it was felt that it was worth showing these items on a special page on this website with descriptions for each item.

Select the image, below, for a larger sized image which opens in a new window. below this photo are descriptions of the individual items.

The Wilson Family Memorial to John Wilson
The Wilson Family Memorial to John Wilson

Photo of John Wilson (left).
Private John WILSON, 240407. 2nd Battalion the Yorkshire Regiment. Son of James and Annie Wilson, of Wombleton. York. Killed 14 November 1917. Aged 21.
Born Wombleton (Kirbymoorside), Enlisted Malton, Resided Wombleton
Buried BAILLEUL COMMUNAL CEMETERY EXTENSION (NORD).

Illuminated Commemorative Scroll (centre)
Issued to the next of kin of anyone in the forces who was killed, or died from any cause (wounds, accident, or illness) at home or abroad during the War and up to 1920.

Memorial Plaque (right)
Made of bronze, with the name of the person who died inscribed on the plaque. Variously known as "Death Plaque" , "Widow's Penny" or "Dead Man's Penny". Issued to the next of kin of anyone in the forces who was killed, or died from any cause (wounds, accident, or illness) at home or abroad during the War and up to 30 April 1920.
See "The Great War Memorial Plaque".

1914 - 1915 Star (left medal)
The 1914–15 Star was authorised in 1918 and was awarded for service in specified theatres of war between 5 August 1914 and 31 December 1915. The medal was awarded for service around the world, in any theatre of war or at sea. to British Forces of all kinds.
A similar looking medal is the 1914 Star which was awarded for service between 4 August 1914 (the day Britain declared war on Germany) and midnight of 22 November 1914.
No-one could receive both medals.

The British War Medal (centre medal)
The British War Medal was a campaign medal of the British Empire, for service in World War I. The medal was approved in 1919, for issue to officers and men of British and Imperial forces who had rendered service between 5 August 1914 and 11 November 1918. The medal was later extended to cover the period 1919-20.

The Victory Medal (right medal)
The medal was issued to all those who received the 1914 Star or the 1914-15 Star, and to most of those who were awarded the British War Medal - it was never awarded singly. These three medals were sometimes irreverently referred to as Pip, Squeak and Wilfred.


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